Law as a career in india

Thursday, June 15, 2017

The legal profession in India has undergone a strategic and substantial change over the last few decades. Now-a-days the law aspirants not only figure themselves in courts but mark the presence in various corporate houses, law agencies, law firms, litigation, administrative services and many more.

Earlier it was seen that the law has become a family profession. The families had been choosing law as professions for generations. But the scene has changed today, anyone having the traits and passion for this field can opt for the course and could achieve.

These days a significant change you can see and admire among the students. These students soon after their higher secondary schooling, start exploring for the career prospects. They are seen more curious and serious towards their career choices. It is an old proverb that an examinee is the best examiner, thereby a student aspiring for any profession knows it accordingly. You only need to have passion, patience and urge, else everything is dependent on your hard work.

Law is a career which requires loads of patience and logical skills. It takes loads of hard work and dedication to become a successful lawyer. First generation lawyers particularly face numerous problems in their profession as is true of every other profession. It becomes easier if one trains under a Senior Counsel in the beginning of their career. This is not to say that newbies cannot make it own their own. Anything is possible with determination and of course, hard work. Great communication skills and a faculty for critical analysis and articulation are pre-requisites for lawyers.

There are a plethora of opportunities for a law graduate. One can either practice as an advocate in a court of law or work with corporate firms. By clearing exams conducted by Public Service Commissions, a law graduate can become a judge. After gaining experience, a law graduate can hope to become Solicitor General, a Public Prosecutor or offer services to government departments and ministries. One can also work as a legal adviser for various organisations. Teaching in colleges, working with NGOs and working as a reporter for newspapers and television channels are other attractive options.

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